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September 2018 work summary

Things slowed down a bit in September, which was okay because I also started teaching a class this month.

I did have one large job at the start of the month that more than paid the rent. This was a commercial job and it involved moving a forum from phpBB 3.0.14 to 3.2.2. I was working as a subcontractor. The contractor’s client had a very particular look and feel to his forum and he wanted that to be retained as much as possible, so the challenge was to do this despite the fact that many modifications on the forum were not available as extensions. Obviously this meant making sure the style closely matched the phpBB 3.0 style. I did the prototyping work in a development environment. It took a long time to get things tweaked before I was given permission to move the changes into production. The first attempt at an upgrade of the database failed due to a resource timeout. The second attempt worked but took about six hours using command line interface. I installed the mChat, ReImg Imag Resizer, Google Analytics, Post Count Requirements and later NavBar search extensions. I set up Q&A spambot countermeasure. I removed dead modules and dead software including Tapatalk. The rest was styling work. I created a custom style based on Prosilver SE and then tried to emulate look of existing site. I added archives link to navigation bar, put the Twitter logo in the footer, and customized the footer to add link to site. Three templates were changed. Style customizations were placed in stylesheet.css. Later, there was four hours of additional styling work working from a punch list. One of the challenges was to do the work quickly. It was four days from start to finish. Given that this was a big forum, this was a moderate challenge.

Also in September:

  • I updated a forum from phpBB 3.2.1 to 3.2.2. There was a routing error caused by modSecurity being enabled. I disabled it and was able to post. Also upgraded PHP from 5.5 to 7.1 for about 50% faster performance for the client.
  • Similar to my last work for this client, I created MySQL triggers to subscribe people in the registered users and newly registered users groups to get topic and post notifications, but on a different domain.
  • I updated a forum from phpBB 3.1.4 to 3.2.3. (phpBB 3.2.3 was released in the middle of the month.) I installed an updated Aero style. I removed the Board3 portal extension. I installed updated extensions: Topic Preview and Notify Admin on Registration. I upped PHP version to 5.6 from 5.4. I changed the spambot countermeasure to use reCaptcha V2. I installed my digests extensions (version 3.2.8) and tested email using both a manual test and cron.
  • I updated phpBB from version 3.2.2 to 3.2.3 for a client using update files method. Updated five extensions that were out of date.
  • I updated another forum from phpBB 3.2.2 to 3.2.3. I updated the Tapatalk extension from 2.0.8 to 2.1.3. I had to reapply a style change to common.css.

With the release of phpBB 3.2.3, the phpBB group not only fixed some bugs that really needed fixing (including one that only allowed one attachment per post) and the migrator issues that gave me hell, but it also appears that the update program will now update any extensions that need updating, if the links work correctly. This is normally a good thing but if you wrote any custom changes to these extensions this might overwrite them, and there is no warning of this. You are not supposed to do this, but I have clients who have done this or asked me to do it for them. The update program really needs some sort of warning or a switch of some sort so these don’t happen automatically.

Update prices lowered!

It’s not often that I lower prices. But I lowered my prices for updates by 50%. Updates are when you go from one micro version of phpBB to another, like 3.2.2 to 3.2.3.

I had raised these prices because the changed files process I used stopped being reliable. Which meant that I had to upload all the files for a version to ensure success, which was more time consuming, particularly if there were files with custom changes in the styles folder I have to replicate.

With the release of phpBB 3.2.3 though, it looks like these problems are ironed out. This means in most cases the labor is less than an hour. Hence the price is now $40 commercial and $20 noncommercial.

I noticed the updater will also attempt to upgrade extensions, a time saver. It’s not always perfect however. So when you ask me to update your extensions too, if the updater for phpBB does this as well there is no extra work for me to do, hence no additional charge.

Should I install phpBB?

What are you getting into when you install phpBB? phpBB, open-source forum software for the web, is often simple to install. Most web hosts have a scripting center that allows you to install it on a domain in a few clicks. But should you?

It’s not like there aren’t other forum solutions out there, although arguably phpBB is the one that has survived the longest. To name a few, there is commercial vBulletin software, myBB, Xenforo, Phorum and pUNbb. There are also forum plugins. For example, WordPress has BBPress and BuddyPress. Since I specialize in phpBB I can’t speak with much authority about other forum solutions. However, as a software engineer I can highlight what I think some of phpBB’s strengths and weaknesses are, the subject of today’s posts.

What is forum software exactly?

Before you decide on any forum solution, understand what forum software is. Forum software is not blog software. It’s not a place that you use to rant about stuff that interests you and which others can comment. It is software that allows lots of disparate people to discuss certain topic areas elegantly. It imposes discipline on the content it manages by keeping things organized in forums, topics and posts.

Forum software is used by discrete communities that have something in common and want to share that information in an open manner. Usually what they are discussing is pretty specialized. For example, it might be a support forum for a commercial or open-source product (phpBB.com uses phpBB for its support forum), or a fan site, a bunch on people who own a particular type of boat or plane, whatever! Forum software allows people to create and reply to topics. It’s designed to run independently of a framework. For example, the BBPress plugin for WordPress requires it to work as an add on to WordPress, which means that to use BBPress you must also be a WordPress user on the site. Similarly, Facebook groups can act a bit like a forum, but it requires you to join the Facebook enclave. Facebook however does not organize content in its groups into forums and topics. Most forum software is designed to be standalone, at this is certainly the case of phpBB. It’s not designed to work with WordPress or any other content management system. In our social media age, this is sometimes a drawback.

phpBB’s emergence

phpBB has a long and proud legacy. Version 1.0 was released in 2000, at just the moment that the PHP language became dominant on the web, replacing mostly a lot of Perl scripts. Timing was everything. It was written in PHP, used the popular free MySQL database and was free and open-source. “Open source” was kind of a new thing back then, but it was essential to its growth. Not only was it free, anyone could modify it.  So it got downloaded and installed like crazy. It’s still widely used today. Most support sites run on phpBB. This means you have probably used phpBB already, even if you aren’t aware of it. So it will seem comfortable and familiar, even if you don’t understand why.

Version 2 came a year later in 2001 and is still being used today by many sites because it is fast and lightweight. Version 3 was released in 2007, which thoroughly modernized it. Version 3.1 arrived belatedly in 2016. It’s big feature was extensions, similar to WordPress plugins plus responsive styles, so things looked good on mobile devices. Prior to 3.1 if you wanted to extend phpBB’s functionality you installed “mods” that was code changes inside the source code, which made upgrading phpBB difficult. 2016 saw the release of version 3.2, the current version, which looks and behaves a lot like 3.1 but addressed some annoying issues mostly on the backend.

While phpBB was undoubtedly popular, updates were infrequent and its huge legacy base made it hard to push out new versions. Its team of core developers worked inefficiently together, in part because the tools for doing so were relatively primitive at the time. This allowed many other forum solutions to emerge to fill the feature gap while the phpBB group lumbered awkwardly forward into the future.

phpBB’s strengths

I first installed phpBB 2.0 in 2002 and have followed it since then. I have developed modifications and extensions, as well as generating good income from helping users upgrade and migrate their forums. In spite of the phpBB Group’s sometimes lumbering organization, it’s got some major strengths:

  • Institutional legacy. Simply because it’s been around so long, it tends to get widely installed and used. Those who have phpBB forums rarely move to other forum solutions.
  • Familiarity. Most likely you already know how to use phpBB because you have used it on various sites. While the forum/topic/post metaphor is hardly new, phpBB’s implementation of it garnered it a lot of attention and traction, so most forum solutions try to imitate it while addressing its perceived deficiencies.
  • A fanatical devotion to open source. The phpBB Group developers walk the walk on open source. They are really quite devoted to the whole idea of open source software, quite fanatical and arguably more than a little obsessed about it. They don’t give preference to any particular technology (except PHP and web standards like HTML, CSS and Javascript) and try to give you flexibility. For example, most forum solutions are written only for the MySQL database. Despite the fact that hardly anyone who has a phpBB forum uses databases other than MySQL, they support a whole host of other databases including Postgres, SQLite and Oracle.
  • Terrific support. phpBB’s support forums are phenomenal. You will likely find a dozen answers to your question with a simple search but if not a quick post will generate fast response, often from dozens of highly experienced support members, all volunteers. They are so good that in most cases the problems I encounter I don’t have to solve. I can find the solution on their support forums.
  • An anal obsession to standards. This is both a strength and a weakness. WordPress has now something like 40% of the web site market, but WordPress runs fast and loose. It’s not hard at all for people to create buggy plugins and non-optimal themes and WordPress will approve a lot of these. WordPress is a Wild West place where you are never quite sure if what you are adding on is crap or gold. That’s not a problem with phpBB. They go to extraordinary lengths to check their releases for bugs, running them against a host of security tools and making the base code pass thousands of detailed automated tests. I doubt there is an open source project that releases higher quality code. As an extension author, I am impressed and sometimes annoyed by how difficult it is to get my extensions approved. They inspect everything with incredible care and make sure you adhere to their voluminous and often somewhat obscure coding standards. This also makes things slow as there are plenty of extensions and styles in the review queue and reviews can take months. Rest assured though that officially approved extensions and styles are top quality.

phpBB’s weaknesses

  • Lack of agility. The phpBB Group’s tendency toward being anal also means they are not agile. It’s hard to bring out new versions of phpBB since everything must be nitpicked to death. Arguably this is also because there are tons of features and options in phpBB; look through all the Administration Control Panel’s various screens sometimes to get an idea of how many features can be changed, enabled and disabled. Its permissions system alone is awesomely powerful while awesomely obscure. When finally released, new versions tend to be very stable and rock solid but if you are an impatient person, your patience will definitely be tested and then some. On the other hand, their development practices are top notch. They use state-of-the-art testing, development and bug tracking tools. They have daily builds of their software to see what breaks.
  • Legacy architectureAdding new features tends to be excruciatingly difficult not because their code is not modular enough (this problem largely went away with phpBB 3.1) but because the database is so baked in. Many features would mean large changes to the database. Business logic is baked into many different programs, although phpBB 3.1 introduced classes (the whole /phpbb folder) that addressed a fair amount of this problem.
  • No multi-threaded topics. This means you can’t see a set of replies to a particular post within a topic, or get a hierarchical view of replies to a topic.
  • Standalone. It doesn’t integrate with anything, at least not elegantly. It won’t work seamlessly with your content management system, like WordPress. The closest it comes to this is that it supports authentication via LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), but even so users must still create accounts on the forum to use it.

There is a lot more to this topic that I may delve into in future posts. But this post at least gives you a heads up. phpBB is great software: stable, reliable, well tested and industrial strength. If you can live with its functionality and limitations and are okay if the features change slowly at best, it’s still a terrific solution. If you need more agility from your forum solution, you might have to look elsewhere. However, any other solution you pick may not hang around. phpBB is eighteen years old and is likely to survive another eighteen years without a sweat.

 

August 2018 work summary

I kept busy with phpBB work in August but fortunately not too busy. It was all just right for a change.

The big project was a Amazon Web Services (AWS) rehosting project that consumed four days after about two months of erratic testing and prototyping. I wrote about the project as it relates to AWS here. However, there were other details of wrapping up this project unrelated to AWS:

  • A heavily modified AllanStyle SUBSILVER style was used, with the colors tweaked to closely match the old style. During the prototyping there were all sorts of things that had to be just right because the community is very fussy and they wanted extremely high fidelity for what they used to have. This style is basically you only choice now if you like the boxy, full width styling of the old phpBB subsilver2 style. Members in a certain group had to have a different color number name and font size, so it took a lot of puzzling there to get something acceptable. Fine tuning the styles included moving the view topic author column from the right to the left, and getting the width of this column just right to match what they had. There were some peculiar requirements such as having the Administration Control Panel open in a separate tab and adding additional links to the navigation bar.
  • Six extensions were installed: Advertisement management, Pages, Media Embed, Smartfeed, Smilies Scroll and Topic Preview. There was quite a bit of work getting the advertisement management extension to serve ads correctly and to the correct groups.
  • I created a forum test environment and kept it around so subsequent changes could be tested there before being deployed to production.
  • Some BBCode was in the database for ranks messing up the display of ranks. These had to be removed from the database.
  • There was a peculiar program that returned one line of Javascript to another site that needed to be modified because the upgrade introduced line feeds into the output.
  • Figured out why hide my online status wasn’t working. It was a permissions issue.
  • There was also BBCode in the user_jabber column that could not be edited and had to be manually removed in the database. It messed up editing profiles. I discovered the Jabber module was not enabled, so I enabled it.
  • Changed the text in the email templates to match content that was in there before.
  • Later in the month there were more requested tweaks. The client wanted more ads to display on the view topic screen, every ten posts. This is not built into the Advertisement management extension. I used the group template variables extension to get the group information I needed and tweaked the view topic template to serve the ads unless users were in a particular group. Now they want another ad on the index between forums that I am working on.

Other work in August:

  • I upgraded a forum from phpBB 3.1.6. to 3.2.2. I reinstalled an updated Latte style. Four extensions had to be upgraded: Joined Date Format, Board Rules, Reimg Image Resizer and Topic Solved. I reapplied the background logo and footer links. There was an issue when posting. Email notifications did not go out because SSL check didn’t work, causing an error. Disabling it allowed posts to be saved but email notifications still did not go out. Client had to get a correct set of SMTP settings from their web host to fix the emailing issue.
  • Stood up a new forum and new domain for an existing client of nine years using a forum solution largely the same as their existing forum, Siteground hosting was selected on my recommendation. Installed phpBB 3.2.2, placed logo after resizing it, installed an orangish style to match the logo colors. Hid forum content from public. Disabled user registration. Installed ACP Add User extension. Installed and tested Tapatalk extension and access. Set up email account and forwarder to test email interface via SMTP. Set up SSL using free Let’s Encrypt certificates. Added Mailing List extension with same changes I made for their other site. Created a robots.txt file to deny search engines. Disabled contact form. Need to manually add users when deployed. Currently this project is not complete and is in user testing. As a result of testing, I applied a new style and made a number of fine styling changes, including some fine color changes. I also applied new specified fonts to forum name and site description. Installed media embed extension to embed a video.
  • Client reported this error: “Error: [phpBB Debug] PHP Warning: in file [ROOT]/includes/functions.php on line 4190: ob_start(): output handler ‘ob_gzhandler’ conflicts with ‘zlib output compression'”. Solved by changing PHP to 7.1, turning off the PHP ziplib extension, but needed to turn on mysqli extension because on this host it was not enabled by default. Later, it was discovered that some searches timed out after 30 seconds. I changed tables from MyISAM to InnoDB storage engines, but this did not solve the problem. I changed the PHP timeout to 60 seconds but the error still happened. I changed search index to MySQL FullIndex and it did not solve the problem. Eventually I determined the PHP mbstring extension needed to be enabled. I filed this as a documentation issue with the phpBB Group as enabling this PHP extension is not a system requirement.
  • Updated a forum from phpBB 3.2.1 to 3.2.2. Was getting messages including “Parameter must be an array or an object that implements Countable.” The update made the error go away.
  • Upgraded Tapatalk mod for a phpBB 3.0 forum to version 5.0.1 and made necessary file changes too. I removed the Tapatalk rebranding module because it was giving errors and is not needed.
  • Styling work to integrate site headers and footers onto phpBB 3.2.2 using prosilver on a test site. 3 templates modified. Stylesheet changes were added to stylesheet.css. This project is not quite complete yet, but nearly so.
  • Upgraded Tapatalk mod for phpBB 3.0 from version 4.9.8 to 5.0.0 for a client. I removed the Tapatalk rebranding module because it was giving errors and is not needed.

 

 

You probably don’t want to host phpBB on Amazon EC2

Occasionally I do something new. This month something new meant helping to rehost a client on Amazon Web Services (AWS). AWS provides cloud computing services, and its EC2 service (EC = Elastic Computing) is probably its most popular service.

Cloud services provide scalable services. Also, you pay for what you use. They can be configured so that if there are spikes in demand the service will become “elastic”, scaling to meet demand.

I did not do this rehosting by myself. The client had another technical guy that set up and configured his AWS EC2 workspace. The forum is very large with 2.6M posts. In addition to rehosting the forum, I had to upgrade the client at the same time to the newest version of phpBB and move his WordPress site. This project literally took months to complete, although I was not working on it all the time.

I don’t know what Amazon Machine Instance (AMI) was set up in this case. I don’t think the AMI chosen was ideal because WordPress had technical issues that required fine tuning EC2 to get things to work. One thing I took away from the project though is that there is a “tax” if you move to AWS. The learning curve is steep and the tools available to you are miniscule.

Some lessons learned:

  • AWS doesn’t do any handholding. While you get a console to configure EC2, you don’t get any rich control panel like cPanel or Plesk to allow you to easily do complex things. So there is no File Manager, no phpMyAdmin (unless you want to install it yourself), no easy way to create mailboxes or send email. Instead, you need a UNIX geek. I was given a SSH key file and I had to use that to do my work. This meant doing pretty much everything from the command line.
  • Connecting to the AWS workspace was complex since I had to use SSH. The command lines used to connect with SSH were long to type in and easy to get wrong. I had to reference an argument to use the key (.pem) file I was given. When you work from the command line, it’s easy to type something incorrectly. So you often end up typing the command multiple times until you get it right. Closing and opening sessions becomes time consuming and a hassle.
  • To access the database, I had to do it from the command line. It took a while to get database credentials and since I had to do things from the command line again I had to type statements very carefully. I had to export and import databases but getting the syntax just right was challenging. I frequently had to go into the database to tweak things, which meant typing a lot of SQL statements. It’s a good thing I am very fluent in SQL. This really slowed me down. Had I had phpMyAdmin, I would have saved hours of time and hassle.
  • File permissions were a pain. The default user did not have the permissions to the web root folder, which meant becoming root and granting correct group and file permissions. Then secure FTP would work. These problems kept recurring which made the process quite tedious and time consuming.
  • The Apache web server was not configured correctly for WordPress. The AMI was apparently not tuned for WordPress, so it took research and carefully editing of a httpd.conf file to get the settings right. Then the web server had to be restarted from the command line, which is not intuitive, particularly since it had to be done as root.
  • Editing files became a pain. There was a lot of this, mostly tweaking forum styles, templates and configuration files. Since I had only the command line, I had to use a command line text editor. I chose nano, but it was still tedious. There is also a lot of command line navigation to get to the right folders where you needed to do stuff. This would have been easier if I had an editor on my computer that worked with SSH and .pem files. I had the former but not that latter, as I use an old copy of Dreamweaver to more easily edit files remotely.
  • I often had to become root to do things, like read the error_log file to troubleshoot issues.
  • The database import for the forum failed three times. I finally figured out the issue from the obscure error message. I had written two triggers for the client and that required CREATE TRIGGER privileges that were not granted to the default MySQL DBA. I had to snip these lines out of a 2GB+ export file to get the import to succeed. This has never been a problem on other hosts I have worked on.
  • Setting up HTTPS was a pain. It too required special permissions to create public and private key files, on the command line only, of course. It took many attempts before it worked and a valid certificate was installed. While we were waiting to test WordPress and the forum, it required using the long URL provided by AWS, which meant changing the configuration of WordPress and phpBB via the database.

I suspect that the wrong AMI was used or that using a better one would have prevented a lot of problems. In any event, the move to AWS turned out to be tricky, time consuming and a large hassle. For my client, it was an expensive endeavor. It turned out that all this work turned into my largest bill ever. In that sense it was good, although I would have been happier if it had spent a lot less time and a lot less of his money.

Now that my client is on AWS though, as long as it is tuned properly there will be some big advantages. Hosting may cost less in the long run, and the service should be more predictable and scalable.

If you take up a project like this, you will definitely need someone who has set up AWS EC2 instances successfully and will work through all these issues with you. Even so he could not do it alone. The migration took four days to complete, although the forum was functional in less than twenty four hours.

For very large forums that need scalability and high reliability, using a cloud service like AWS makes a lot of sense. However, a project like this should not be taken lightly. Most forum owners will probably be much more comfortable on a good shared host, or a good virtual or dedicated server. 

 

Digests version 3.2.8 released

See this post on phpbb.com for details.

This version of the extension can be downloaded from my digest extension page or from the GitHub 3.2.8 branch page. When downloading from GitHub, remember that it must be copied into a blank /ext/phpbbservices/digests folder.

Of course disable the current digest extension first then remove the /ext/phpbbservices/digests/* files. Then upload the new version then enable again.

Adding Slack workspace

Using email as a primary means to contact me has some disadvantages, such as long threads that make it hard to find information and lags in my responses. So in response I’ve created a Slack workspace: https://phpbbservices.slack.com.

If you join my workspace you can ask me questions anytime. Hopefully I’m on my computer and can respond quickly. Otherwise I will respond when I am available and you can look for my response in the workspace’s channel of your choice.

If you use the #general channel what you post is public to anyone in my workspace. So most of the time use the direct message feature to keep our conversation private.

We’ll see how this goes. I’m fairly new to Slack too so you may know more about it than I do!

You can read more about Slack here.

 

July 2018 work summary

Happily, there was a lot more work in July than there was in June. I am noticing that I tend to get called in for more complex projects and fewer simple projects. One effect this has is that these projects can span months. I worked on two projects like this during July that I do not detail below, but will when finally completed. They will have amount to nice sales when they finally cash in. Both projects are complex upgrades from phpBB 3.0 where there were many customizations by previous developers (including me). Moving them to phpBB 3.2 involves a lot of talking, compromise and prototyping. Both involve standing up test instances of their forums and iterating through them getting the style and features right. As for the other work I did in July:

  • Upgraded a forum from phpBB 3.0.12 to 3.2.2. I had to do it minus the tools I usually have. I had only SSH access. As such there were various technical issues. Trying to make a database backup took a long time in phpBB. But with root privileges I was able to do it very quickly. There were issues uploading files. I had to change the Unix group I was in to get the file permissions correct. I seemed to lose ability to create directories using Secure FTP. I worked closely with client who did some work and gave me additional privileges. There was an unexpected issue with /config directory that did not properly upload and a missing line in the config.php file. Th install folder was not recognized. I had to fix some database issues with upgrade, mostly done from the command line. I reapplied styling changes including logo, various buttons and some help links. Search indexes would not work (MySQL fulltext) so I created phpBB native index instead. I removed dead modules and updated spambot countermeasure to use reCaptcha V2.
  • Troubleshooting. The host set PHP 7 as the new default version of PHP, which caused issues bringing up the phpBB 3.0 forum. I could only revert back to PHP 5.6 on a phpBB 3.0.12 forum but it came up. Later, I upgraded the forum to phpBB 3.2.2 which does work with PHP 7. There were no issues. I placed the logo, changed the spambot countermeasure to reCaptcha V2, added a home link, and removed dead modules.
  • I created two MySQL database triggers to add forum notifications, similar to work for another client in May. This was more involved since 17 forum notifications were needed for each user in the group. I also wrote SQL to make the phpbb_forum_watch table contain rows for all existing users in the newly registered users and registered users groups, so the new triggers would work for people in these groups. I analyzed an issue with notification emails being checked by default. It looks like the two critical ones (new topics in subscribed forums, and replies to topics in subscribed topics) are set by default. I suggested not to turn additional email notifications on by default but it can be done with a trigger if necessary.
  • Fixed a digests issue on version 3.2.7 of my digests extension for a client. Digests were not going out reliably with their cron. A manual test worked fine. To fix cron job I removed /forum from the path since the forum is in a subdomain and added /usr/bin to the curl path.
  • Issue of FatalErrorException in container_builder.php line 146, which brought the forum down. /cache/development folder had 755 permissions. Removed it, changed config.php so phpBB development mode was disabled, cleared the cache manually, and the forum came back up.
  • I upgraded a forum from phpBB 3.0.5 to 3.2.2. The old style was not available, so a new style choice had to be made. The default prosilver style was used. There were some minor issues during upgrade that I had to puzzle through. I added the old logo. I recreated the MySQL full text search index. I added reCaptcha V2 spambot countermeasure and enabled it. I removed some dead modules including old AutoMOD modules. I added a home link.
  • Troubleshooting. There were issues with users not getting email notifications when registering or for forum/topic replies. First I advised setting email package size to 0. That did not seem to work, so I was asked to test it. I created an account and verified that both the registration email was received and forum notifications were received. It is now working correctly. Some permissions looked odd: newly registered could only reply to topics and registered users could not post in most forums.
  • Installed the mChat extension on a new forum with the Flat Style Blue style. Used cPanel to upload the extension. Later, I made text changes to mChat (changing its title to “Live Chat” among other changes) and removed credit lin,e substituting one provided by user. Some days later, I installed the forum icons extension and an archive of forum icons mentioned in the topic for the extension. The next day, the client requested some tutoring so I created a tutorial video using SnagIt. I demonstrated adding an extension, using cPanel, Filezilla, Dreamweaver, File Manager, making a sized and transparent logo and swapping the default logo, changing phpBB’s default text.
  • A site got hit by malware and was recovered. After recovery, I was asked to check the extensions and base code for malware. I upgraded my digests extension and the Cleantalk extension to the latest versions. I compared files with a 3.2.2 reference and found no malware. Later in the month, I removed unneeded phpBB software files, probably from previous versions, that remained in the forum folder. I also enabled the contact form check in Cleantalk because contact form spam was happening. Even later in the month, more spam was reported. Cleantalk extension was somehow disabled. I reenabled it. I removed spam users via Cleantalk once it was reenabled.
  • Troubleshooting. There were regular HTTP 500 errors accessing certain folders in the ACP. When I finally found the web server error log, the log indicated that the /cache/production/twig folder could not be written to. 755 permissions existed. I changed the permissions to 777 and deleted the files inside it that had 755 permissions and the issue was resolved.
  • Troubleshooting. The forum could not send mass emails. Since he has Siteground hosting, passed on what I learned when I set up my hosting: create an account on the domain and configure phpBB to use SMTP. It took a little back and forth with Siteground technical support but this approach eventually proved fruitful.
  • This job was a referral from a recent client. I was asked to straighten out an inconsistent .htaccess file for the site. Issue were http to https redirects weren’t happening, index.html page needed to be hidden if called directly and certain hotlinking needed to work right.
  • The Cleantalk extension was disabled, so spam started to appear, same issue as another client had this month. I updated the Cleantalk extension to the latest version and reenabled it. I found about 20 spam users that I deleted.
  • I installed the Detailed Online View extension, a development quality extension, after warning client it was a bad idea to use any extension that was not approved. It is accessed through the Who’s online link.